LMS JOURNAL

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LMSJ Issue 32

ISBN 978 1 905184 85 9

LMSJ 32 Cover

Contents

  • SEE AMID THE WINTER'S SNOWby Keith Miles
  • LMS TIMES
  • STATISTICAL INFORMATION IN THE 1938 LMS MAGAZINE DIARYby Jim Jackson
  • D. J. NORTON'S SCOTTISH TRIP august 1951
  • THE BOOKING OFFICEby Don Rowland
  • HOW IT WAS DONE Part 7by Terry Essery
  • LMS SIGNALS No. 26 continuedby Reg Instone & L. G. Warburton
  • THE CHIEF DRAUGHTSMEN OF THE LMS RAILWAY AND BR LONDON MIDLAND REGIONby L. G. Warburton

EDITORIAL

The snow is falling as I write this editorial, so it seems only appropriate that we begin this edition with Keith Miles's article, 'See Amid the Winter's Snow'. it is also worth reflecting, by those of us who are old enough to remember the bad winters in the past that society in general and the railways in particular were able to cope rather better than we appear to in the twenty-first century.

We have what could be described as a good mixture for this issue with Graham Warburton continuing with the story of LMS signalling practice and his feature on the Chief Draughtsmen of the LMS, whilst Don Rowland takes us through the work in the booking office using his personal experience of this aspect of railway work. My brother continues the story of 'How it was Done' in the passenger links, whilst another ex-railwayman, Brian Beers, provides a further look at Toton, without doubt the best recorded of all the marshalling yards in the United Kingdom. As I typed the word 'railwayman', it occurred to me that of the eight contributors, six are ex-railwaymen, which probably is the highest percentage of railwaymen authors that we have achieved to date. Jim Jackson examines the LMS Magazine and some statistical details of the company, and Mark Norton has provided some more pictures from his father's collection that were taken in Scotland. Those readers who have copies of D. J. Norton's Pictorial Survey of Railways in the West Midlands Parts 1, 2 and 3 will be aware of the splendid pictures he took in the West Midlands. The compilation of these books was a most enjoyable task.

Wearing my commercial hat, I must also remind readers that some of the early issues of LMS Journal are going out of print. At present Nos. 6, 8, 13 and 17 are out of print and stocks of Nos. 1, 2, 3 and 16 are getting very low, so if you are collecting the series, you will need to hurry. Finally, it occurs to me that with the publication of this edition early in 2011, we have entered our tenth year or, if we relate it to the LMS Company, we are about to see the Stanier engines arrive on the scene. Food for thought maybe!

Bob Essery

LMS Crest