LMS JOURNAL

Back Issues

LMSJ Issue 34

ISBN 978 1 905184 90 3

LMSJ 34 Cover

Contents

  • HIGH PEAK TALESby Keith Miles
  • AGENTS AND STATION MANAGEMENTby Keith Miles
  • WORKS PLATES OF LMS LOCOMOTIVES BUILT BY OUTSIDE CONTRACTORSby Dave Cousins and Ian Castledine
  • THREE NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE PASSENGER TRAINSby Neil Burgess
  • BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTIONS AT CHAPEL-EN-LE-FRITHby Peter Tatlow
  • MILK TRAFFIC - AN OVERVIEWby Steve Banks
  • PRE-GROUPING MOTIVE POWERby Keith Miles
  • LMS JUBILEE EXHIBITION - EUSTONby L. G. Warburton
  • G&SWR CARTING HORSESby Stuart Rankin
  • HINKLEYby Bob Essery
  • THE DISTANT SIGNALby L. G. Warburton
  • LMS TIMES

EDITORIAL

Welcome to LMS Journal No. 34. In this edition we have another diverse mix of articles, with three from the hand of Keith Miles, For a number of years, my wife and I lived within reasonable distance of the Peak District and enjoyed the countryside, although by this time the steam locomotive in regular service had disappeared. Memories of the area are stirred by Keith's first article, The inclines were severe and the ex-North London tank engines, particular favourites of mine, will always be associated with this line. This article and Keith's second help to underline our approach to railway history, an insight into how it was operated and, with his agents and station management article, how it was managed, His third article came as the result of a discussion between us when we agreed that many readers, weaned upon the popular image of steam in the 19605, seem to think that life on the LMS prior to the input of Stanier's locomotives was rather dull, but we have further plans to change this illusion.

Although my name is associated with LMS locomotives, and in particular, in conjunction with the late David Jenkinson, their livery, work plates is a subject that we did no more than touch upon very lightly in our work, so I am pleased to be able to cover the subject in greater detail in this edition. Another LMS favourite is the North Stafford section, a line I came to know during my visits to see my in-laws during the final years of steam, so anything from the 'Knotty' commands editorial interest. We continue with an ex bridge engineer's description of a major project and how it was done, rather more quickly than today I suspect, judging by the time spent on some major railway engineering projects that have taken place during recent years. In place of his usual theme, Graham Warburton has responded to my request and described the story of the distant signal, or, as a driver many years ago said, 'and the most important signal is the distant', although I suspect he used the expression 'the back un', as some railwaymen called them.

Something slightly different is Steve Banks's article on milk traffic, the story of how it was developed and then lost to road transport, The somewhat different approach continues with Stuart Rankin's description of the GWSR carting horses during the pregroup period and into the LMS period, Whilst I only have personal memories, not factual evidence, I can recall railway horses being used to haul various carts when collecting and delivering goods in the City of Birmingham area during the early 1950s, and it would be interesting to know when the motor vehicle finally took over this role.

The 35th edition of LMS Journal, with special content, will be published about mid-November, ten years after the preview was launched at the Warley Model Railway Exhibition held at the NEC Birmingham in 2001. The usual LMS Matters stand will be at this year's show, so Graham Warburton and I look forward to meeting readers on the 19th/20th November.

Bob Essery

LMS Crest